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Fferent surveys using the date of filling in the questionnaire. We then grouped the surveys as follows: 6?8 months = 1-year follow-up, 19?8 months = 2-year follow-up, 29?2 months = 3year follow-up, 43?9 months =4-year follow-up. Women who left one or more follow-up surveys unanswered formed a separate group (intermittent surveys). We classified women into those who had or had not had symptoms in t
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E therapy to either placebo or nothing (the control groups) [21]. Women were recruited in Estonia from 1999?001, and followed by annually mailed questionnaires in 2000?004. Detailed descriptions of the recruitment, inclusion and exclusion criteria, trial treatment, adherence, follow-up and trial outcomes as well as the content of information leaflets and trial questionnaires have been published el
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And. 2UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research and National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), P.O. Box 3033501, Tampere, Finland. 3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, National Institute for Health Development, Hiiu 42, 11619, Tallinn, Estonia. Received: 15 February 2012 Accepted: 17 December 2012 Published: 21 December 2012 References 1. Hemminki E, Topo P, Kangas I: Experience
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Uscript. RL commented the manuscript. PV participated in the designing of the analysis and commented the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. Acknowledgement This study was partly financed by Academy of Finland grant 2007?010 (decision number 115088). We thank all women who participated in the trial, the trial staff at clinical centres, and the staff at the National Inst
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Men's experience of the menopause. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1996, 103:1025?028. Mitchell ES, Woods NF: Symptom experiences of midlife women: observations from the Seattle midlife women's health study. Maturitas 1996, 25:1?0. Jokinen K, Rautava P, M inen J, Ojanlatva A, Sundell J, Helenius H: Experience of climacteric symptoms among 42?6 and 52?6-year-old women. Maturitas 2003, 46:199?05. Col NF, Guthr
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Among all menopausal women (occurring in 16?2 of premenopausal, 39?7 of perimenopausal and 35?0* Correspondence: elina.hemminki@thl.fi 1 National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), P.O. Box 3000271, Helsinki, Finland Full list of author information is available at the end of the articleof postmenopausal women). In a Finnish populationbased study by Hemminki et al. (1995), 28 of women aged
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Four "often" reported symptoms were urinary frequency (52.2 ), tiredness (45.5 ), poor sleep (27.5 ) and back pain (19.5 ). Among the women surveyed, 16.2 claimed to sometimes or often be incontinent. Referrals to the incontinence nurse increased > 8 fold during the study period. Conclusions: The PSI provides a comprehensive inventory of pregnancy related symptoms, with a mechanism for assessing
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E not available for all women. Furthermore the numbers of women in early menopause were few. These complications of data led us to the crude analysis used in the study. However, our analysis was good enough to show the variability between women, and suggest the need for larger follow-up studies to describe the natural course of menopausal symptoms. To estimate the duration of symptoms among unsele